Benjamin Rush Milam William Alexander Milam




Please help to discontinue the propagation and perpetuation of outdated conclusions, false research, and mis-information of the Milam family history.






MILAM GENEALOGY OUTLINE


The following is a very generalized overview of the earliest known history and genealogy of the Milams of Virginia. This outline is not thorough. It is merely a simplified account of the basics of what is known of these earliest Milams. Meanwhile, DNA samples, and the continued ongoing research for early original Milam records has significantly uncovered new documents and discoveries leading to changes in what we know of these earliest Milam generations.



MILAM BROTHERS


At this time, most all Milams in the United States can prove descent from one of two men who are found in Virginia as early as the 1730s and 1740s. These men are the Milam Patriarchs, John and Thomas. Though it originally could not be proven, it has always been traditionally believed that John and Thomas were brothers. In December 2016, DNA samples from male descendants of John and Thomas has been studied in depth and it was determined conclusively that John and Thomas were in fact brothers.

I. John Milam is estimated to have been born before 1718, and it is known he was married to a woman named Judith, possibly Bartlett, as early as 1739 or earlier. It was long believed that John may have lived in Louisa County, Virginia [this is highly questionable] before he is found in Halifax County as early as 1764. He is known to have lived until sometime shortly after 1782, but before 1785 he then migrated to York County, South Carolina where he died and left a will in 1789. Meanwhile, John Jr. reported he was born in Brunswick County, Virginia in 1753, and new records have confirmed the elder John Milam was there as early as 1752. However, new exciting research has discovered and confirmed that this John Milam, of Halifax County, Virginia and York County, South Carolina, is the same John Milam found in early Chesterfield County records beginning as early as 1760 through to 1765. These early Chesterfield County records, discovered by William F. Milam, M.D. of Richmond, can be found posted on the Ancestry.com Milam Family Message Board. John is noted to have been a soldier of the Revolutionary War. John and Judith had 10 children.

II. Thomas Milam was born before 1716 and married Mary Rush no later than 1744, though most likely much earlier. Early records find Thomas living on the north side of Doubletop Mountain near a Gap that takes it's name from him; Milam Gap. His land was part of Orange County, Virginia until 1749, when it then became part of Culpeper County. Thomas sold this land in Culpeper County in 1760 and in 1761 migrated to Bedford County, Virginia where he died and left a will in 1775. Thomas and Mary had 7 children. For a more extensive, very detailed and in-depth study and accounting of Thomas Milam, I very highly recommend the website Milam In Virginia by William F. Milam, M.D., of Richmond. It is very extensive.



SONS OF THE MILAM BROTHERS


Most Milams in the United States today descend from the following sons of these early Virginia Milam Patriarchs:

SONS OF JOHN

I. Samuel Milam, is speculated and highly probable a son of John; this speculation is due to the naming patterns of his grandsons, combined with his appearance in an early Chesterfield County court record where and when John Milam is found as well. Samuel is estimated as born circa 1742 in Virginia and was married to Sarah Kemp by early 1763; new evidence suggests this would have been in Chesterfield County where he and she are found in early court records at this time. Samuel is known to have lived in Goochland County as early as 1764 before he is found in Henry County, Virginia in 1778 until about 1782 when he is estimated to have migrated to Abbeville County, South Carolina. Here he is found in 1790 and 1800 census records. There is a very early record of a Samuel Milam in Jasper County, Georgia being sued by a Dudley Milam (circa 1811). Samuel and Sarah had three known sons from whom many descendants are found, by 1860, in Georgia, Alabama, Tennessee, Mississippi, and Arkansas.

II. Adam Milam, is speculated as very likely a son of John; this speculation is due to the naming patterns of his grandsons, combined with his appearance in an early Brunswick County court record where and when John Milam is found as well. Adam is estimated as born circa 1744 in Virginia, and was married to a woman named Elizabeth circa 1760 in Virginia. Before the Revolutionary War, circa by 1774, he migrated to Bute County, North Carolina, living just over the border of Halifax County, Virginia where John Milam and sons are found about this same time. Bute County was discontinued in 1779 and Adam lived in the portion that became Warren County where he died and left a will in 1789. Adam and Elizabeth had five sons from whom many descendants are found, by 1860, in North Carolina, Tennessee, and Alabama.

III. James Milam, is speculated as very likely a son of John; this speculation is due to the naming patterns of his grandsons, combined with his appearance in early Chesterfield County, then Halifax County, court records where and when John Milam is found as well. He is estimated as born circa 1746 in Virginia and married a woman named Martha. He lived in Halifax County, Virginia, the portion of which became Pittsylvania County where he is estimated to have died by 1793; the year Martha, his widow, was remarried in Montgomery County. James and Martha had nine children, including four daughters, from whom many descendants are found, by 1860, in southwestern Virginia, northeastern Tennessee, southern West Virginia, and eastern Kentucky.

IV. Bartlett Milam, proven as the son of John; per named as a son in the will of John. Bartlett is estimated as born circa 1748 in Virginia, and was married to Elizabeth Guinn circa 1770 in Halifax County, Virginia. He lived in Halifax County, Virginia until 1796 when he migrated to Laurens County, South Carolina. There he died in 1822. Bartlett is considered a Patriot of the Revolution, having provided supplies to the American forces. He had eleven children from whom many descendants are found, by 1860, in South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Tennessee, Arkansas, and Texas.

V. John Milam Jr., proven son of John; per named as a son in the will of John. John Jr. was born in 1753 in Virginia and married first to Nancy and second to Polly Allison. He was a soldier of the Revolutionary War from Halifax County, Virginia. He migrated to Laurens County, South Carolina before December 1786 when he is first found owning land there. He eventually left there for Madison County, Alabama where he is found receiving a land patent in 1816. He died there in 1838. He had twelve children, all by Nancy, from whom many descendants are found, by 1860, in South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, and Mississippi.

VI. Thomas Milam, proven son of John; per named as son in the will of John, and was made administrator of the estate. He is estimated as born circa 1757 in Virginia and married to Elizabeth Talbert in 1786 in Halifax County, Virginia. He migrated to South Carolina, shortly after 1786, living in Laurens County. He migrated to Henry County, Georgia circa 1819 and died there circa 1823. He had eight children, from whom many descendants are found, by 1860, in Georgia, Tennessee, and Arkansas.


SONS OF THOMAS

VII. William Milam, son of Thomas, was born circa 1746 in Virginia and married a woman named Sally. He was a soldier of the Revolutionary War. He lived in Bedford County, Virginia until his death in 1790. He had ten children, from whom many descendants are found, by 1860, in Virginia and North Carolina.

VIII. Benjamin Milam, son of Thomas, was born circa 1748 in Virginia and married Elizabeth Jackson circa 1772 in Bedford County, Virginia. He was a soldier of the Revolutionary War and died on June 19, 1781 in captivity after the Battle of Guilford Courthouse, North Carolina. He had five children, from whom many descendants are found, by 1860, in Kentucky, Ohio, and Missouri.

IX. John Milam, son of Thomas, was born circa 1750 in Virginia and married Anna Jackson circa 1768 in Bedford County, Virginia. He died in 1780 in Bedford County, Virginia. He had eight children, from whom many descendants are found, by 1860, in Kentucky, Alabama, Mississippi, and Indiana.

X. Moses Milam, son of Thomas, was born circa 1752 in Virginia and married Elizabeth Boyd in 1774 in Bedford County, Virginia. He was a soldier of the Revolutionary War. He lived in Bedford County, Virginia until 1788 when he migrated to Fayette County, Kentucky where he lived until about 1796 when he settled in Franklin County, Kentucky where he died sometime between 1810 and 1820. He was the father of the famous Benjamin Rush Milam of the Texas fight for Independence. Moses was the father of eight children, from whom many descendants are found, by 1860, in Kentucky and Texas.

XI. Zachariah Milam, son of Thomas, was born circa 1755 in Virginia. He lived his whole life in Bedford County, Virginia where he died sometime between 1820 and 1830. He had eight children, from whom many descendants are found, by 1860, in Virginia and Indiana.

XII. Rush Milam, son of Thomas, was born in 1759 in Virginia and married Ann Elizabeth Fowler in 1783 in Bedford County, Virginia. He was a soldier of the Revolutionary War. He lived in Bedford County, Virginia until 1792 when he migrated to Botetourt County, Virginia where he lived until 1812 when he migrated to Kanawha County, Virginia where he died between 1840 and 1850. Kanawha County was in the part of Virginia which became the independent State of West Virginia. Rush had ten children, from whom many descendants are found, by 1860, in Kanawha County, West Virginia.





Please help to discontinue the propagation and perpetuation of outdated conclusions, false research, and mis-information of the Milam family history.






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