Sedona

 
 

ARIZONA'S OTHER CITIES AND TOWNS


Arizona has a great number of cities and towns throughout the state that offer a wide variety of things to see and do.




BISBEE


Though they share a region and a legacy of mining, Tombstone and Bisbee are on opposite ends of the tourism spectrum. Bisbee, a quirky art town perched along cliffs, embraces its independent spirit (a popular hotel composed of 1950s travel trailers) and vertical nature (dozens of staircases are among the fastest, and most traveled, routes in town). Enjoy the galleries, then descend into a copper mine to see how Bisbee came to be.

BISBEE


OLD BISBEE GHOST TOUR

“Ghost Host” takes visitors on a walking tour of the historic mining town of Bisbee, Arizona. Down streets, up stairs, and through alleys, after dark, you will discover and learn about the ghosts that haunt this 125 year old town. Learn their history and favorite haunts while seeing Bisbee the way that few people do, after dark. Visit the haunts of Julia, a lady of the evening who enjoys the company of married men staying alone in her room. Nat the miner, who owed money to the Money Man and paid with his life. And the Lady in White who saved the life of three children.

Fridays and Saturdays, 7pm (during busy seasons a second tour offered at 9pm) $12; $7 for children 11 and younger

Private tours and reservations must be made in advance. Call or check Web site for more information and meeting place.

OLD BISBEE GHOST TOUR





CAMP VERDE


FORT VERDE STATE HISTORIC PARK

Experience life through the eyes of a frontier soldier at Fort Verde State Historic Park in Camp Verde. The fort was a base for General Crook’s U.S. Army scouts and soldiers in the 1870s and 1880s. From 1865 – 1891 Camp Lincoln, Camp Verde and Fort Verde were home to officers, doctors, families, enlisted men, and scouts. The park is the best-preserved example of an Indian Wars period fort in Arizona. Several of the original buildings still stand and living history programs are scheduled periodically, giving visitors a glimpse into Arizona’s history. Today visitors can experience three historic house museums, all furnished in the 1880s period, that are listed on the National and State Register of Historic Places. The former Administration building houses the Visitor Center with interpretive exhibits, period artifacts from military life, and history on the Indian Scouts and Indian Wars era. The park offers picnic tables, restrooms, RV and tour bus parking, and is ADA Accessible.

Please visit the website for more information, including a video about the park, days and hours of operation, fees, events and activities, and more:

FORT VERDE STATE HISTORIC PARK





CLARKDALE


VERDE CANYON RAILROAD

Take a train ride through the Verde Canyon wilderness, past Indian ruins, through a 680-foot tunnel and over old-fashioned trestles. See Web site for train schedule. Price may vary for special events. Verde Canyon Railroad, 300 N Broadway Rd Clarkdale, AZ, 86324, PHONE: 800-320-0718

VERDE CANYON RAILROAD





CORDES JUNCTION


ARCOSANTI

World renowned Architect Paolo Soleri founded the concept of Arcology, architecture coherent with ecology, and the resulting project of Arcosanti. He studied under Frank Lloyd Wright at Taliesin West in Scottsdale, Arizona. In 1956, he permanently settled in Scottsdale and made a life-long commitment to research and experimentation in urban planning, establishing the Cosanti Foundation. The Foundation's major project is Arcosanti, a prototype town for 5,000 people, under construction since 1970, located at Cordes Junction, in central Arizona, 65 miles north of Phoenix.

ARCOSANTI





FLAGSTAFF


FARMERS MARKET

A truly wonderful early Sunday morning experience.

The Flagstaff Community Market (FCM) is a regional producers market that operates for growers and producers of agricultural and related products. The primary purpose of the Market is to support small and medium sized independent growers and producers by providing citizens with a local alternative to corporate and globalized food production. The intent is to connect growers and consumers and encourage people, both urban and rural, in growing more of their own food. A secondary purpose is to provide an outlet for small-scale producers of value added food products, local artisans, and community and sustainable agricultural groups. Additionally, it is the purpose of the Community Farmers Market to provide a Community gathering space for residents and visitors to Flagstaff to mix in a relaxed, educational, and fun environment.

Sunday mornings in the City Hall West Parking lot on the corner of Route 66 and North Sitgreaves Street.

FLAGSTAFF COMMUNITY MARKET


HISTORIC DOWNTOWN FLAGSTAFF

Along Historic Route 66, up Leroux Street and down San Francisco, the old town architecture is filled with an abundance of things to see and do. A wide variety of locally owned shops range from cafes to gift shops, restaurants to bars, from artisan shops to local breweries and wine shops. With live music at Heritage Square and unique vendors on every corner, there is plenty to see and do. Be sure to visit the Visitors Center at the Historic Train Depot.

HISTORIC DOWNTOWN FLAGSTAFF


JOSEPHINE'S MODERN AMERICAN BISTRO

Located just blocks from historic downtown, Josephine's Modern American Bistro offers a unique Flagstaff fine dining experience. Chef Tony Cosentino, Chef of the Year recipient, frequently updates the menu to showcase the best produce and seafood the season has to offer. The menu features a wide selection of American Fare, where everyone is sure to find something they like. Pair your meal with a bottle of wine from our extensive wine list which has been featured on the Wine Spectator's Award of Excellence for the past six years.

Come for either dinner or lunch in a casual and comfortable environment. Our restaurant features two lit fireplaces in the winter perfect for romantic dinners and a beautifully landscaped patio in the summer for a casual lunch while enjoying the wonderful Flagstaff mountain climate. The building in which Josephine's is housed has been placed on the National Historic Register for its outstanding example of Craftsman Bungalow architecture.

Great food and ambiance. A truly wonderful dining experience.

JOSEPHINE'S MODERN AMERICAN BISTRO


LOWELL OBSERVATORY

I highly recommend a visit and tour. Very fascinating. Beautiful location.

Lowell Observatory offers guided 45-minute tours, on the hour (9 a.m. through 4 p.m.)

Lowell Observatory was the first astronomical observatory in Arizona. In 1894, Percival Lowell, a mathematician and amateur astronomer from Massachusetts, was one of several astronomers in search of clearer skies through which to observe the planets and stars. Lowell hired A.E. Douglass to find an ideal site for the new observatory. After an intense but colorful scouting mission centered on what was then the Arizona Territory, Douglass found Flagstaff to be the best location with its good "seeing," dark skies, and high elevation. (An exhibit opened in 2005 in the historic Rotunda library is on display for daytime visitors to learn about the founding of Lowell Observatory. Also on display is the first telescope used to determine the best site for Lowell Observatory). Spurring Lowell on was the knowledge that Mars would soon be at its closest point to the Earth--an ideal time to continue the study of Mars more closely. Percival Lowell assembled a small staff, borrowed two telescopes, and commenced observations.

Two years later, the specially designed 24-inch Alvan Clark refracting telescope that Lowell had ordered, was installed. For many years, the Clark Telescope was the major research tool of Lowell Observatory. Percival Lowell used it himself, and his many hours of observing Mars through the Clark Telescope resulted in hundreds of drawings used to create "Mars globes." Today these globes are considered key archival treasures in astronomy history, and visitors from around the world can see them on display at the Observatory.

The massive Clark Telescope--a central attraction for daytime and nighttime visitors to Lowell Observatory--even journeyed to Mexico where Lowell expected to get an even better view of Mars at its opposition with Earth. The telescope was returned to Flagstaff in 1897, where it has been ever since. In 1966 it was designated a National Historic Landmark.

Although Percival Lowell founded the Observatory primarily to explore the possibility that intelligent life might exist on Mars, the Observatory's research expanded into other areas, resulting in one of its most important discoveries by V.M. Slipher: first evidence that the universe is expanding (1912 - 1917).

In 1930, Clyde Tombaugh, an amateur astronomer from Kansas, completed a search started by Lowell some 25 years prior: the search for a ninth planet. Clyde Tombaugh's discovery took place on February 18, 1930. Based on the suggestion of a young English girl, the new planet was named Pluto. Both the telescope used in this historic discovery and the Zeiss Blink Comparator, an instrument used successfully to examine the photographic plates of the discovery are on on display for visitors to the Observatory.

Other noteworthy discoveries by Lowell Observatory include the co-discovery of the rings of Uranus, and the continuing search and discovery of numerous near-Earth asteroids, comets, Kuiper Belt Objects, and extra-solar planets. Observatory astronomers are also conducting a decades-long study of the photometric stability of the Sun, and astrophysics is also a growing research area at Lowell Observatory.

Do visit the website for a wealth of general and detailed information:

LOWELL OBSERVATORY


METEOR CRATER

A nickel-iron meteor crashed into the northern Arizona Plateau about 50,000 years ago resulting in a significant bowl shaped crater that is still very apparent today. Whether from a distant photo, or standing on the edge of the rim, you get the feeling you are on the moon looking at one of its many craters. But instead, you are in Arizona. The first proven, best preserved meteorite crater on earth is just 35 miles east of Flagstaff on I-40 at exit 233. With a visitor center, gift shop, an interactive learning center and a theater, plus an RV Park and Subway Restaurant, it is a great place to spend a day and “Experience the Impact!” The Arizona crater was the forerunner in the understanding of all other craters later discovered and confirmed around the world. Not only do you learn about the astronomy and geology of the crater and meteorite, you also learn about man’s discovery and study of the crater, including its use by the Apollo Astronauts for preparation and practice at walking on the moon. Meteor Crater Visitor Center is open daily. Visitation hours are as follows: Memorial Day to September 15th 7:00 AM to 7:00 PM Rest of the year 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM Thanksgiving Day open from 8:00 AM to 1:00 PM Closed Christmas Day Admission Prices: Adults: $15.00 - Seniors (age 60 and older) $14.00 - Juniors (age 6-17) $8.00

Be sure to visit the website for a wealth of additional information and details:

METEOR CRATER


RIORDAN MANSION HISTORIC STATE PARK

Built in 1904 for two Riordan families, Riordan Mansion is an impressive reminder of gracious living in a small, territorial logging town. The historic building is an Arizona treasure — a remarkable example of Arts and Crafts style architecture featuring a rustic exterior of log-slab siding, volcanic stone arches, and hand-split wooden shingles. The expansive home has forty rooms, over 13,000 square-feet of living area, and servant's quarters. The Riordan residence was designed by the creator of Grand Canyon's El Tovar Hotel, Charles Whittlesey. Please visit the website for more information, including a video about the park, days and hours of operation, fees, events and activities, and more:

RIORDAN MANSION HISTORIC STATE PARK


SUNSET CRATER VOLCANO NATIONAL MONUMENT

This beautiful cinder cone volcano 15 miles northeast of Flagstaff was the last major volcano to erupt in Arizona, occurring in the winter of 1064-1065 A.D. The area contains several colorful cinder cones formed by extinct volcanoes and large expanses of lava and ash. The dominant peak has distinctive dusky red-brown patches formed by oxidized iron and sulphur. The contrasting colors of the cinders provide the most striking aspect of the Monument, but the buckled and twisted lava fields are also very dramatic. Be sure to stop by the Visitor Center and then walk the park’s two trails amongst the “geologically” fresh lava flows. Camping is allowed near the Visitor Center.

SUNSET CRATER VOLCANO NATIONAL MONUMENT


WUPATKI NATIONAL MONUMENT

Connected to Sunset Crater Volcano National Monument, this park of ancient Indian ruins is an incredible and beautiful place to visit. Less than 800 years ago, Wupatki Pueblo was the largest pueblo around. It flourished for a time as a meeting place of different cultures; yet this was one of the warmest and driest places on the Colorado Plateau, offering little obvious food, water, or comfort.

WUPATKI NATIONAL MONUMENT





JEROME


Jerome draws visitors with its Old West history and sends them away with a healthy appreciation for its modern-day charm. This hillside town of defunct copper mines and brothels, ghost stories and historical building is home to artists, writers, merchants, hippies and restaurateurs.

JEROME





KINGMAN


HOOVER DAM

It took five years, $49 million and 4.4 million cubic yards of concrete to build. Begun in 1931, it straddles the Arizona-Nevada border, so geographically is only half Arizona's. Even so, it's still a wonder. You must take the tour to really appreciate it. The most awe-inspiring view is from the base of the dam where its 726-foot height truly overwhelms.

HOOVER DAM





LAKE HAVASU CITY


LONDON BRIDGE

In 1968, chainsaw tycoon Robert McCulloch bid $2.4 million for the London Bridge with hopes that it would be just the thing to rev up interest in Lake Havasu City. He spent another $7 million transporting the bridge stone-by-stone from England and reassembling it where it now spans a small channel from Lake Havasu.

LAKE HAVASU CITY





PAYSON








PRESCOTT


SHARLOT HALL MUSEUM

See the museum's nine buildings and four gardens including the Territorial Women's Rose Garden. Exhibits date from 1864 to present day. Also visit for a number of events throughout the year. Sunday, 12:00 PM - 4:00 PM, Monday-Saturday, 10:00 AM - 4:00 PM, Sharlot Hall Museum, 415 W. Gurley St. Prescott, AZ, 86301, PHONE: 928-445-3122, PRICE: $5 : $5; free for age 17 and younger

SHARLOT HALL MUSEUM


THUMB BUTTE TRAIL

With more than 450 miles of multiuse trails winding past ponderosa pines, granite boulders, Native American petroglyphs and pristine lakes, there's no end to outdoor activities around Prescott and in Prescott National Forrest. One of the closest trails to downtown Prescott (and one of the most popular) is Thumb Butte Trail. This moderate, 1.75-mile hike on a paved path takes about an hour to complete. From the top, you can see the city, the Bradshaw Mountains, Sierra Prietas, Granite Mountain, Mingus Mountain and the San Francisco Peaks. After your hike, visit downtown Prescott, with its art galleries, antique shops, unique restaurants and the famous Whiskey Row of saloons. Prescott National Forest, 928-443-8000

THUMB BUTTE TRAIL





SAHUARITA


TITAN MISSILE MUSEUM

The Titan Missile Museum is the only publicly accessible Titan II missile site in the nation. Tour the underground missile site. See the 3-ton blast doors, the 8-foot thick silo walls, and an actual Titan II missile in the launch duct. Visit the launch control center, experience a simulated launch and more! Monday-Sunday, 8:45 AM - 5:00 PM Titan Missile Museum, 1580 W Duval Mine Rd, Sahuarita, AZ 85629 PHONE: 520-625-7736, PRICE: $6 - $9.50 : $9.50; $8.50 for seniors and military; $6 for kids 7-12.

TITAN MISSILE MUSEUM





SEDONA


Sedona is one of Arizona's must-see wonders. At the end of Oak Creek Canyon, another scenic destination, the town is known not only for rock formations such as Coffee Pot Rock, Cathedral Rock and Courthouse Butte, but also for its hiking and biking trails, art galleries and spiritual-energy vortexes. Marvel at the red rocks, find the one that looks like Snoopy, have your picture taken in front of Bell Rock, trek up to the Chapel of the Holy Cross, get a bird's-eye view from the airport, search for bargains at Tlaquepaque. Meanwhile, there are lesser-known, hidden-away places that are well worth exploring. And they don't cost nearly as much as a foray into the upscale shops. The McDonald’s in Sedona is the only one in the world with turquoise arches.

SEDONA


CHAPEL OF THE HOLY CROSS

Take a tour of the Chapel of the Holy Cross perched delicately amid the red rocks. Sit in the pews and admire the view through immense picture windows behind the altar. Take in a glorious view of Sedona’s stunning rock formations from the patio. Chapel of the Holy Cross sits atop a pinnacle 250 feet above the valley floor. The chapel blends in with its surroundings, looking almost as if it was a natural formation.

CHAPEL OF THE HOLY CROSS





SUPERIOR


BOYCE THOMPSON ARBORETUM STATE PARK

Learn about desert plants at Boyce Thompson Arboretum State Park. The park contains several trails to check out more than 3,000 types of Sonoran Desert vegetation and wildlife, as well as gardens so you can get ideas for your see how to plant your own xeriscape. Boyce Thompson hosts special events, including seasonal plant sales, music performances, art workshops and bird and butterfly walks. Details: 37615 U.S. Highway 60 Superior, AZ. 85273 Phone: 520-689-2811

BOYCE THOMPSON ARBORETUM STATE PARK





TOMBSTONE


Though they share a region and a legacy of mining, Tombstone and Bisbee are on opposite ends of the tourism spectrum. Tombstone's rough-and-tumble past appeals to the outlaw in all of us. The shoot-out at OK Corral put the town on the map and continues to draw visitors, who can watch daily re-enactments of the gunfight. Tombstone also claims the world's largest rosebush, which is worth a look once you've spent enough time along Toughnut Street and Boot Hill.

TOMBSTONE


TOMBSTONE COURTHOUSE HISTORIC STATE PARK

Get a glimpse of the true old West at Tombstone Courthouse State Historic Park. Built in 1882 in the shape of a Roman cross, the two-story Victorian structure once housed the offices of the sheriff, recorder, treasurer, board of supervisors, jail, and courtrooms of Cochise County. Today, the 12,000 square foot courthouse is a museum filled with the glitter and guns of those who tamed the territory. Exhibits portray the authentic history of Tombstone as a frontier silver mining boomtown. Learn about miners, cattlemen and pioneers, and see a reproduction of the courtroom and sheriff’s office. Displays include a tax license for operating a brothel and an invitation to a hanging. A replica of the gallows in the courtyard represents where seven men were hanged. The park includes a museum, exhibits, a gift shop, restrooms, and shaded picnic areas. Please visit the website for more information, including a video about the park, days and hours of operation, fees, events and activities, and more:

TOMBSTONE COURTHOUSE HISTORIC STATE PARK





TUCSON








WILLCOX


REX ALLEN ARIZONA COWBOY MUSEUM

An illustration of the life history of Rex Allen and the Willcox Cowboy Hall of Fame, which honors individuals involved in the area's cattle industry. The grounds also serve as the final resting place for Allen and his horse, KoKo. Rex Allen was a noted “singing cowboy” with a very unique and beautiful voice. You might recognize his voice as the narrator of many of the Disney wildlife documentaries of the 1960s and 1970s. Sunday-Saturday, 10:00 AM - 4:00 PM, Rex Allen Arizona Cowboy Museum, 150 N. Railroad Ave. Willcox, AZ, 85643, PHONE: 520-384-4583, PRICE: $2 - $5 : $5 per family; $3 per couple; $2 per single.

REX ALLEN ARIZONA COWBOY MUSEUM





WILLIAMS


GRAND CANYON DEER FARM

Feed and pet more than 100 deer, reindeer and axis deer as well as talking birds, wallabies, coatimundi, marmosets, mini cattle, camel and bison. Also visit the gift shop on your way out to find something to capture the memories. Arrive at least one hour before close, wear old nad comfy clothes and bring a camera. Open 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Jan.-March and Oct.-Dec. and 9 a.m.-6 p.m. March-Oct. Winter hours are weather permitting, closed Thanksgiving and Christmas days. Grand Canyon Deer Farm, 6769 E. Deer Farm Road Williams, AZ, 86046 PHONE: 928-635-4073, 800-926-3337

GRAND CANYON DEER FARM





YUMA


YUMA TERRITORIAL PRISON STATE HISTORIC PARK

On July 1, 1876, the first seven inmates entered the Territorial Prison at Yuma and were locked into the new cells they had built themselves. At Yuma Territorial Prison State Historic Park walk through the actual strap iron cells and solitary chamber of Arizona Territory’s first prison. Now a museum, the building houses photographs and colorful exhibits of those who once “involuntarily” stayed there and the prison life they had to endure. A total of 3,069 prisoners, including 29 women, lived within the walls during the prison’s 33 years of operation. Despite an infamous reputation, written evidence indicates that the prison was humanely administered, and was a model institution for its time. The only punishments were the dark cells for inmates who broke prison regulations, and the ball and chain for those who tried to escape. Come experience this fascinating slice of Arizona history. The park offers a museum with exhibits, a gift shop, video presentation, picnic area, and restrooms.

Please visit the website for more information, including a video about the park, days and hours of operation, fees, events and activities, and more:

YUMA TERRITORIAL PRISON STATE HISTORIC PARK





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created 6/14/2012: ©2012-2013, Robert M. Wilbanks IV, Scottsdale, Arizona